Bookshelf Juxtapositions #15

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #14

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #13

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #12

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #11

Because I can never read just one book at a time.

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #10

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #9

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #8

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #7

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #6

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #5

The same painting from two different angles.

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #4

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #3

Bookshelf Juxtapositions #2

Interesting bookshelf juxtapositions

Sunday morning, reading a first book by someone I know casually, who is really crappy at writing dialogue. I’m interested in the story, but there’s so much unconvincing and often cliché back and forth between the main character and his best friend…and I’m only up to chapter 3.

I’m thinking today about contract negotiations, the shrinking budget for public higher education in NYC, how the pandemic has exacerbated that, and what if the executive committee I serve on turns out to be the one on whose watch the campus where I teach starts laying people off?

My Year-Long Writing Project - first post on my new Blot website.

Even Layla thinks it gets boring. She won’t even look at the papers.

One of the hardest parts of paper grading for me is the monotony. My students—who’re the same age as always while I’m older—are of course thinking these thoughts for the first time. I, on the other hand, have been reading them, or thoughts very close to them, for many semesters.

This poem, by Ellen Bass, is lovely and painful and necessary:

“I want your scent in my hair.

I want your jokes.

Hang your kisses on all my branches, please.

Sink your fingers into the darkness of my fur.”

Grading, grading, without an end in sight…

(To the tune of “sailing, sailing…)

The latest issue of my newsletter is out, focused on the process of putting together a book of poems and the new website I’ve put together (on Blot) for the reading series I run.